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New York Secretary of State
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General information
Office Type:   Partisan
Office website:   Official Link
Compensation:   $160,000
2022 FY Budget:   $194,270,000
Term limits:   None
Structure
Length of term:   Until the end of the term of the governor by whom he or she was appointed and until his or her successor is appointed and has qualified
Authority:   NY Laws – Article 6 (EXC)
Selection Method:   Appointed by governor
Current Officeholder

New York Secretary of State
Robert Rodriguez
Democratic Party
Assumed office: 2021-12-20

Other New York Executive Offices
Governor • Lieutenant Governor • Secretary of State • Attorney General • Comptroller • Commissioner of Education • Agriculture Commissioner • Financial Services Superintendent • Environmental Conservation Commissioner•Labor Commissioner • Public Service Commission • Insurance

The Secretary of State for New York is an appointed state executive position in the New York state government. The secretary of state serves as the head of the Department of State, which acts as the state’s planning agency and keeper of records, including the Great Seal of New York.[1] The secretary is responsible for the regulation of certain businesses and professions. The secretary also regulates cemeteries, registers corporations, and business organizations, and maintains business and governmental records under the Uniform Commercial Code and other laws, among other duties.[2]

New York has a Democratic triplex. The Democratic Party controls the offices of governor, secretary of state, and attorney general.

Current officeholder

The current acting officeholder is Robert Rodriguez (D). His nomination is pending confirmation by the New York State Senate.[3]

Authority

The secretary of state’s establishment and authority is derived from Article 6 of the Executive chapter of the New York Laws.

EXC Article 6, Section 90:

There shall be in the state government a department of state. The head of the department shall be the secretary of state …[4]

Qualifications

Note: Ballotpedia’s state executive officials project researches the constitutional or statutory text that establishes the requirements necessary to qualify for a state executive office. That information for the New York Secretary of State has not yet been added. After extensive research, we were unable to identify any relevant information on state official websites. If you have any additional information about this office for inclusion on this section and/or page, please email us.

Appointments

New York state government organizational chart

The secretary is appointed by, and serves at the pleasure of, the governor and is confirmed by the state senate.[4]

Vacancies

Note: Ballotpedia’s state executive officials project researches the constitutional or statutory text that details the process of filling vacancies for a state executive office. That information for the New York Secretary of State has not yet been added. After extensive research, we were unable to identify any relevant information on state official websites. If you have any additional information about this office for inclusion on this section and/or page, please email us.

Duties

The secretary of state serves as the head of the Department of State, which acts as the state’s planning agency and the keeper of records, including the Great Seal of New York.[1] Duties of the office include, but are not limited to:[2]

  • Arranging and preserving all laws, gubernatorial documents, and other documents kept or deposited with the office;
  • Supervising the division of consumer protection and establishing public education programs to maximize awareness;
  • Biannually publishing the legislative manual;
  • Administering the address confidentiality program for victims of domestic violence, human trafficking, sexual offense, and stalking;
  • Promulgating rules establishing the procedure, forms, style, and font for every state code, rule, and regulation; and,
  • Collecting fees for corporate filings, papers not required to be certified, and other requests made of the department.
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Divisions

The Department of State consists of the following divisions:[5]

  • Administrative Hearings
  • Administrative Rules
  • Building Standards & Codes
  • Cemeteries
  • Community Services
  • Consumer Protection
  • Corporations, State Records & UCC
  • General Counsel
  • Licensing Services
  • Local Government Services
  • Office for New Americans
  • Office of Planning & Development

State budget

See also: New York state budget and finances

The budget for the Department of State in Fiscal Year 2022 was $194,270,000.[6]

Compensation

See also: Compensation of state executive officers

The salary of the secretary of state is determined by the New York State Legislature as mandated by Article 6, Section 90 of the Executive chapter of the New York Laws:[4]

2021

In 2021, the secretary received a salary of $160,000, according to the Council of State Governments.[7]

2020

In 2020, the secretary received a salary of $160,000, according to the Council of State Governments.[8]

2019

In 2019, the secretary received a salary of $120,800, according to the Council of State Governments.[9]

2018

In 2018, the secretary received a salary of $120,800, according to the Council of State Governments.[10]

2017

In 2017, the secretary received a salary of $120,800, according to the Council of State Governments.[11]

2016

In 2016, the secretary received a salary of $120,800, according to the Council of State Governments.[12]

2015

In 2015, the secretary received a salary of $120,800, according to the Council of State Governments.[13]

2014

In 2014, the secretary received a salary of $120,800 according to the Council of State Governments.[14]

2013

In 2013, the secretary received a salary of $120,800 according to the Council of State Governments.[15]

Historical officeholders

Note: Ballotpedia’s state executive officials project researches state official websites for chronological lists of historical officeholders; information for the New York Secretary of State has not yet been added because the information was unavailable on the relevant state official websites, or we are currently in the process of formatting the list for this office. If you have any additional information about this office for inclusion on this section and/or page, please email us.

Recent news

The link below is to the most recent stories in a Google news search for the terms New York Secretary of State. These results are automatically generated from Google. Ballotpedia does not curate or endorse these articles.

Contact information

New York

Physical address:
Department of State
One Commerce Plaza
99 Washington Ave,
Albany, NY 12231-0001

Phone: Contact list

See also

New York State Executive Elections News and Analysis

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External links

  • New York Department of State

Footnotes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Department of State, “About the Department,” accessed Feb. 1, 2021
  2. 2.0 2.1 Justia, “NY Exec L § 90-144 (2019,” accessed Feb. 1, 2021
  3. Spectrum News 1, “Hochul nominates Assemblyman Robert Rodriguez for New York secretary of state,” November 4, 2021
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Justia, “NY Exec L § 90 (2019),” accessed Feb. 1, 2021
  5. Department of State, “Home,” accessed Feb. 1, 2021
  6. New York State Budget, “FY 2022 budget summary,” accessed September 20, 2021
  7. Issuu, “The Book of the States 2021,” accessed September 28, 2022
  8. Issuu, “The Book of the States,” Sept. 30, 2020
  9. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries, 2019,” accessed Jan. 27, 2021
  10. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries, 2018,” accessed Jan. 27, 2021
  11. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries, 2017,” accessed Jan. 27, 2021
  12. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries, 2016,” accessed August 27, 2016
  13. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries, 2015,” accessed August 27, 2016
  14. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries,” accessed December 3, 2014
  15. Council of State Governments, “Selected State Administrative Officials: Annual Salaries,” January 27, 2014

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